Here's a question I bet you haven't thought about recently, can you legally bury a dead family member on your property in Missouri?

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Being a renter it wasn't an option I thought about when my wife passed away. I did what most of us do. Made arrangements with a funeral home and let them take care of my wife's remains. While burying your spouse is a difficult thing to do, working with a funeral home made this part much easier for me.

Yet, if you live in the country or have a fair amount of land that you own, perhaps you've thought about burying your family on your property. The short answer to the question, can you legally bury a dead family member on your property in Missouri is Yes, you can.

There are some steps you need to take in advance of creating your family cemetery on your property. NoLo.com says, "Missouri law permits the establishment of family burial grounds of less than one acre in size. The cemetery must be deeded in trust to the county commission, and you must record the deed with the county clerk within 60 days."

U.S. Funerals Online expanded on the information on NoLo.com. "A deed must be drawn up and the land deeded in trust to the County Commission, and you should check with local county ordnance before committing any land. The deed must be filed within 60 days. You do need to ensure that any burial plot is at least 150 feet from any water supply and 25 feet from any power lines or land boundaries."

So yes, as a matter of fact, if you'd like to bury family members on your land, it's not impossible in Missouri.

Ghosts of the Once Great Lewis & Clark Tower

WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter this property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing on private property.

Built in 1963, opened in 1964, and a landmark by the late 1960s, The Louis & Clark Tower north of St. Louis was a destination for those looking for a swanky meal in the building's 10th-floor Top of the Tower Restaurant. Couples on date night could also check out a movie, or go bowling, in the attached retail section of the building. By the end, condominium values in the building had plummeted, much of the retail space was being used by social services, and some units in the building didn't have water. The elevators didn't work either. By 2014 authorities stepped in and condemned the building, forcing the few who still called the tower home out of the building.

In 2020 Tom V shot some video of the now abandoned building including the Top of the Tower Restaurant and some of the apartments. You can watch the video here.

Gallery Credit: Rob Creighton

Virtually Explore This Abandoned Grain Elevator Off Of I-29 In KC

If you ever drive I-29 heading north out of downtown Kansas City you've probably seen the huge grain elevator by the railroad tracks. Now step inside and take a virtual tour of the abandoned elevator.

WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter this property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing on private property.

Gallery Credit: Rob Creighton

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