So just for a little context, I've bought my childhood home from my father.  We've lived next to the same lady since the 80's. Her husband died about ten years ago,and since then she's had a series of roommates.  I admit, I don't know any of these people. They seem nice, but I think they might be a little eccentric. I found this jar of what looks like homemade pickles near the curb in her yard.

It's been there for about three weeks. So, instead of asking my neighbor about it like a normal person, I asked Facebook. Here's some of what they had to say. Some people thought it might be something health related.

Pickled eggs? But still wouldn't explain why it's there...

 

They are fermenting something.

Some people were a little more cynical.  All in good fun, of course.

Jenkem.*

 

Demon fetus. Clearly. Do NOT let it hatch.

 

Don't touch it. It's bait for a trap. You'll end up in the basement rubbing the lotion on your skin or else you'll get the hose again.

 

Others were more optimistic.

Homeschooling science experiment?

 

Lol. What's the harm in taking a look? Go ahead and touch it.

So we had a little fun with it, I guess. But I'm still curious as to WHY it's there as much as I am about what it is. It looks like pickles, but why is it out by the curb? It's right next to her minivan, did she drop it and just leave it there? Why would you just leave it there? If you didn't want it, why wouldn't you just toss it? Is she really that oblivious that she doesn't see it?

What do you guys think?  What's going on in my neighbor's yard?

Curiously yours,

Behka

 

 

 

*According to Wikipedia, Jenkem is a supposed inhalant and hallucinogen created from fermented human waste. In the mid-1990s, it was reported to be a popular street drug among Zambian street children. They would put the feces and urine in a jar and cover it with a balloon then let it ferment out in the sun, then afterwards they would inhale the fumes created. In November 2007, there was a moral panic in the United States after widespread reports of jenkem becoming a popular recreational drug in middle and high schools, though the true extent of the practice has since been called into question. Several sources reported that the increase in American media coverage was based on a hoax and on faulty Internet research.